Stress-related emotions that increase breast cancer risk

Stress-related emotions that increase breast cancer risk

Stress-related emotions that may reduce resistance to cancer include these: repressed anger, a feeling of helplessness, hopelessness, depression, and grief. Not surprisingly, certain cancers have proven to be more likely after stressful life events. Researchers have found, for example, that the risk of developing breast cancer is higher after a women has lost a spouse or a close friend. This intensity is reflected in changes in the immune system. Australian researchers observed changes in T-cell function in twenty-six people who had recently lost a spouse, finding them significantly lower than for people who were not mourning a loved one. Depressed T-cell activity has been shown in women who had lost their jobs. Natural killer cell activity is also lower in individuals under stress. It is not the event themselves that cause stress reactions, but how you respond to them. Everyone does not handle a particular situation in the same way.

Healthy Eating for Life to Prevent and Treat Cancer, Physicians Committee For Responsible Medicine.

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