Metabolic Diet

Metabolic Diet

see Kelley Metabolic

Abstract: In this study we investigate the impact of the dietary ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids (FAs) from postweaning until adult age upon tumor growth, lipid peroxidation in tumor tissue, and metabolic indicators of cancer cachexia in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Weanling male Wistar rats received a normal low-fat (40 g/kg diet) chow diet or high-fat diets (300 g/kg) that included fish oil (FO) or sunflower oil or blends of FO and sunflower oil to yield n-6 to n-3 FA ratios of approximately 6:1, 30:1, and 60:1 ad libitum. After 8 wk, half of each group was inoculated with 1 ml of 2 × 107 Walker 256 cells. At the 14th day after tumor inoculation, the animals were killed, and tumors and blood were removed. The different diets did not modify the blood parameters in the absence of tumor bearing, except the high-FO diet, which decreased serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations. Tumor weight in chow-fed rats was 19 g, and these rats displayed cancer cachexia, characterized by hypoglycemia, hyperlacticidemia, hypertriacylglycerolemia, loss of body weight, and food intake reduction. Tumor weight in FO-fed rats was 7.7 g, and these animals gained body weight (14.6 g) and maintained blood metabolic parameters similar to non-tumor-bearing animals. Tumor weight in rats fed the diet with an n-6 to n-3 FA ratio of 6:1 was similar to tumor-bearing, chow-fed rats, but they gained 2 g in the body weight and blood metabolic parameters were similar to those in non-tumor-bearing rats. However, a further increase in the n-6 FA content of the diet did not change the cachectic state associated with tumor bearing. In this experimental model, a dietary n-6 to n-3 FA ratio of 6:1 was able to increase food intake and body weight, restore the biochemical blood parameters of cachexia, and prevent the development of cancer cachexia.

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