How cancer tumor cells multiply and how to cut off the tumor's food supply

How cancer tumor cells multiply and how to cut off the tumor's food supply

In cancer, tumor cells proliferate at a wild rate, using up an enormous amount of their "fuel"--oxygen and glucose. To obtain this fuel, tumor cells send out chemical triggers that result in the formation of new blood vessels sprouting from existing small capillaries like branches from a tree, a process called angiogenesis. if the tumor does not initiate this burst of new capillaries, it will be deprived of essential nutrients and cease to grow. Laboratory experiments have shown that genistein, in addition to its ability to act as an antioxidant, inhibits angiogenesis. It cuts the cancer cells from its "fuel", causing it to wither and die. Remarkably, in these laboratory experiments, soy doesn't keep healthy cells from their nutrition: genistein affects only the cells that are dividing abnormally or in wanton growth patterns.

Mary Tagliaferri, MD, L.Ac

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