Fluoridation Videos

Dental Fluorosis: A Cosmetic Effect?

"It is a toxic effect and a cosmetic effect. These are not mutually exclusive. It's toxic and it's cosmetic."
- Dr. Arvid Carlsson, Nobel Prize Laureate in Medicine/Physiology (2000).

"it is illogical to assume that tooth enamel is the only tissue affected by low daily doses of fluoride ingestion."
- Dr. Hardy Limeback, Head of Preventive Dentistry, University of Toronto. (2000). Why I am now Officially Opposed to Adding Fluoride to Drinking Water.

"Common sense should tell us that if a poison circulating in a child's body can damage the tooth-forming cells, then other harm also is likely."
- Colquhoun J. (1997). Why I changed my mind about Fluoridation. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41:29-44.

"Like bones, a child's teeth are alive and growing. Flourosis is the result of fluoride rearranging the crystalline structure of a tooth's enamel as it is still growing. It is evidence of fluoride's potency and ability to cause physiologic changes within the body, and raises concerns about similar damage that may be occurring in the bones."
- Environmental Working Group, "National Academy Calls for Lowering Fluoride Limits in Tap Water", March 22, 2006.

"It seems prudent at present to assume that the ameloblasts are not the only cells in the body whose function may be disturbed by the physiological concentrations of fluoride which result from drinking water containing 1 ppm"
- Groth, E. (1973), Two Issues of Science and Public Policy: Air Pollution Control in the San Francisco Bay Area, and Fluoridation of Community Water Supplies. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, May 1973.

"The safety of the use of fluorides ultimately rests on the assumption that the developing enamel organ is most sensitive to the toxic effects of fluoride. The results from this study suggest that the pinealocytes may be as susceptible to fluoride as the developing enamel organ."
- Luke J. (1997). The Effect of Fluoride on the Physiology of the Pineal Gland. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Surrey, Guildford. p. 176.

"A linear correlation between the Dean index of dental fluorosis and the frequency of bone fractures was observed among both children and adults."
- Alarcon-Herrera MT, et al. (2001). Well Water Fluoride, Dental fluorosis, Bone Fractures in the Guadiana Valley of Mexico. Fluoride 34(2): 139-149.

Dental Fluorosis: What is it?

Dental fluorosis is an irreversible condition caused by excessive ingestion of fluoride during the tooth forming years. It is the first visible sign that a child has been overexposed to fluoride.

Fluoride causes dental fluorosis by damaging the enamel-forming cells, called ameloblasts. The damage to these cells results in a mineralization disorder of the teeth, whereby the porosity of the sub-surface enamel is increased.

While the dental profession claims that dental fluorosis is solely a 'cosmetic' effect, and not a health effect, this statement is an assumption and not a fact. Certainly, dental fluorosis represents a toxic effect on tooth cells. The question is whether tooth cells are the only cells in the body that are impacted.

As noted by former proponent of fluoridation, Dr. John Colquhoun, "Common sense should tell us that if a poison circulating in a child's body can damage the tooth-forming cells, then other harm also is likely."

As noted by Dr. Hardy Limeback, former President of the Canadian Association of Dental Research, "it is illogical to assume that tooth enamel is the only tissue affected by low daily doses of fluoride ingestion."

Over the past 50 years, the prevalence of dental fluorosis has increased quite dramatically in the United States and other fluoridated countries.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, dental fluorosis now impacts 32% of American children. (In the 1940s, dental fluorosis rates in fluoridated areas averaged 10%.)

Not only is the prevalence of fluorosis increasing, but so to is its severity. As noted by Dr. Gary Whitford:

"There is a growing body of evidence which indicates that the prevalence and, in some cases, the severity of dental fluorosis is increasing in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated regions in the U.S... This trend is undesirable for several reasons: (1) It increases the risk of esthetically objectionable enamel defects; (2) in more severe cases, it increases the risk of harmful effects to dental function; (3) it places dental professionals at an increased risk of litigation; and (4) it jeopardizes the perception of the safety and, therefore, the public acceptance of the use of fluorides."

According to recent estimates from the U.S. and British Governments, 2 to 12% of children living in fluoridated communities have dental fluorosis of "esthetic concern" (Griffin 2002; York Review 2000).

Dental fluorosis, of esthetic concern, is an expensive condition to treat. If left untreated, it can cause embarrassment for school-aged children, resulting in psychological stress and damaged self-esteem.

There is also mounting evidence that dental fluorosis in its more advanced stages can leave teeth more susceptible to cavities. As noted by pro-fluoridation dental researcher, Dr. Steven Levy, "With more severe forms of fluorosis, caries risk increases because of pitting and loss of the outer enamel" (Levy 2003).

Q & A on Dental Fluorosis:

"My child has dental fluorosis. What can we do to fix it?"

The damage that dental fluorosis causes to the internal matrix of the teeth is permanent. There is no way to reverse this damage.

However, there are ways to 'hide the damage' -- to treat the surface of the teeth so as to hide the discoloration.

Treatment options for fluorosis vary and will depend in part on the severity of the fluorosis and what you can afford (some of the treatments are very expensive). Some of the more common treatments include:

- Abrasion: Abrasion involves finely sanding off the outer layer of the enamel. It is a common approach when the fluorosis is mild. However, if the fluorosis is of a more advanced severity, abrasion is probably not a good idea as it can bring to the surface of the teeth a highly-porous enamel that will be prone to attrition.

- Composite bonding: Composite bonding first involves lightly roughening the area of the damaged enamel. After etching the enamel, a composite resin (with a color matching your teeth) is "glued" on to the exterior of the tooth.

- Porcelain veneers/laminates: Made out of porcelain, veneers form a ceramic shell over the surface of the tooth. Veneers may need to be replaced after several years, however, which can become quite expensive.

To determine which method of treating fluorosis will be best for you, contact your local dentist. If your dentist doesn't specialize in cosmetic dentistry, he/she should be able to refer you to a nearby dentist who does.

Fluoride Toxicity
How to Detox Fluorides from Your Body

Fluoride is a soluble salt, not a heavy metal. There are two basic types of fluoride. Calcium fluoride appears naturally in underground water sources and even seawater. Enough of it can cause skeletal or dental fluorosis, which weakens bone and dental matter. But it is not nearly as toxic, nor does it negatively affect so many other health issues as sodium fluoride, which is added to many water supplies.

Sodium Fluoride is a synthetic waste product of the nuclear, aluminum, and phosphate fertilizer industries. This fluoride has an amazing capacity to combine and increase the potency of other toxic materials. The sodium fluoride obtained from industrial waste and added to water supplies is also already contaminated with lead, aluminum, and cadmium.

It damages the liver and kidneys, weakens the immune system, possibly leading to cancer, creates symptoms that mimic fibromyalgia, and performs as a Trojan Horse to carry aluminum across the blood brain barrier. The latter is recognized as a source of the notorious "dumbing down" with lower IQ's and Alzheimer's effects of fluoride.

http://www.naturalnews.com/026605_fluoride_fluorides_detox.html


There is clear evidence that small
amounts of fluoride, at or near levels
added to US water supplies, present
potential risks to the thyroid gland,
according to the National Research
Council's (NRC) first-ever published
review of the fiuoride/thyroid
literature.' Fluoride, in the form of
silicofluorides, injected into two-thirds
of US public water supplies, ostensibly
to reduce tooth decay, was never
safety-tested.

"Many Americans are exposed
to fluoride in the ranges associated
with thyroid effects, especially for
people with iodine deficiency," says
Kathleen Thiessen, PhD, co-author
of the government-sponsored NRC
report. "The recent decline in iodine
intake in the US could contribute
to increased toxicity of fluoride for
some individuals...A low level of
thyroid hormone can increase the risk
of cardiac disease, high cholesterol,
depression, and, in pregnant woman,
decreased intelligence of offspring,"
says Thiessen.

Common thyroid symptoms Include
fatigue, weight gain, constipation,
fuzzy thinking, low blood pressure,
fluid retention, depression, body pain,
slow reflexes, and more. It's estimated
that 59 million Americans have
thyroid conditions.'* Robert Carton,
PhD, an environmental scientist who
worked for over 30 years for the US
government, including managing